Spectacular video: Comet ISON imaged from a Langrange point in space

NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, is monitoring Comet ISON as it approaches the sun. NASA’s twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft are parked in Langrange zones, known as the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points, each centered about 93 million miles away along Earth’s orbit. The latest movie from the STEREO-A spacecraft’s Heliospheric…

New paper suggests the sun’s magnetic fields defines climate over the long term

Story submitted by Cornelis de Jager (past president ICSU;past pres. COSPAR) In a recent publication entitled Terrestrial ground temperature variation in relation to solar magnetic variability, including the present Schwabe cycle, Cornelis (Kees) de Jager and Hans Nieuwenhuijzen, from the Space Research Organisation of the Netherlands have analysed the dependence of the global earth temperature…

70-year-old conundrum of the hot solar corona may be solved

From Columbia University Astronomers find clues to decades-long coronal heating mystery Drs. Michael Hahn and Daniel Wolf Savin, research scientists at Columbia University’s Astrophysics Laboratory in New York, NY, found evidence that magnetic waves in a polar coronal hole contain enough energy to heat the corona and moreover that they also deposit most of their…

September doldrums – solar slump continues

While many science related government agencies are shut down (NASA GISS is deemed ‘non-essential’ for example) some remain open due to statements like this: Due to the Federal Government shutdown, NOAA.gov and most associated web sites are unavailable. However, because the information this site provides is necessary to protect life and property, it will be…

Solar gains in Spain may cause warmists pain

From the FECYT – Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology via Eurekalert comes this interesting note about solar forcing. It seems there’s a 2.3% per decade increase in solar radiation observed in Spain. Surely this is more than enough to account for the warming there? Cloud cover is said to be the issue, as Dr.…

CET cooling in line with solar model prediction

Yesterday, WUWT carried the headline: Coldest Spring In England Since 1891.  This essay offers what could be an explanation for it. Judge for yourself. – Anthony Guest essay by David Archibald Back in 2006, I published my first paper in climate science. That paper, Solar Cycles 24 and 25 and Predicted Climate Response, predicted a…

Sun produces four X-class flares in two days

Above: note the four separate events in the last two days – from the WUWT Solar Page (From NASA’s Spaceweather.com) When the week began, the sun hadn’t unleashed an X-flare all year long. In only two days, sunspot AR1748 has produced four. The latest X-flare from this active sunspot occured on May 15th at 0152…

What We Don’t Know

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach Back in August 2010, WUWT ran an article wherein it was claimed that variations in the sun changed the rate of radioactive decay. This, of course, flew in the face of years and years of experimental evidence, starting with the Curies, that the rate of radioactive decay is constant, unaffected…

Three years of the Sun in three minutes

Spectacular three year time lapse video from the Solar Dynamics Observatory In the three years since it first provided images of the sun in the spring of 2010, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has had virtually unbroken coverage of the sun’s rise toward solar maximum, the peak of solar activity in its regular 11-year cycle.…

Current solar cycle data seems to be past the peak

The NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center has updated their monthly graph set and it appears as if the slow downside from what looks like the solar max for cycle 24. Though, it is still possible we could see a second small peak like is visible at the upper left in cycle 23. The 10.7cm radio…

How long to the 24/25 solar minimum?

Guest post by David Archibald Climate has real world consequences, and those operating in fields that will be affected by changing climate bring a different perspective to the problem of predicting what will happen. Bill Fordham, advising the grain industry in the Midwest, kindly sent me a copy of the advice he provides to his…

Solar Update February 2013

Guest post by David Archibald Solar Cycle 24 has already seen five consecutive colder winters. This is a link to a post about a German meteorologist who has seen the light. Eventually people will work their way back to where all the energy comes from. The amount and type of energy coming from the Sun…

NASA on the sun: ‘…tiny variations can have a significant effect on terrestrial climate.”

Researchers have considered the possibility that the sun plays a role in global warming. From NASA GSFC:  Solar Variability and Terrestrial Climate In the galactic scheme of things, the Sun is a remarkably constant star.  While some stars exhibit dramatic pulsations, wildly yo-yoing in size and brightness, and sometimes even exploding, the luminosity of our…

Solar Activity – Past, Present, Future

Essay/paper by Dr. Leif Svalgaard Abstract As our civilization depends increasingly on space-borne assets and on a delicate and vulnerable earth-bound infrastructure, solar activity and its potential impact becomes of increasing importance and relevance. In his famous paper on the Maunder Minimum, Eddy (1976) introduced the notion that the Sun is a variable star on…

A simple resolution to the ‘faint young sun’ paradox?

A faster rotating early-Earth may have compensated for reduced Sun output Guest post submitted by Ian Schumacher The ‘faint young sun’ paradox states that according to star models, billions of years ago the Sun would have only been about 70% as bright as it is today. Given the same environment as today this would result…

Solar corona revealed in super-high-definition

From the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Today, astronomers are releasing the highest-resolution images ever taken of the Sun’s corona, or million-degree outer atmosphere, in an extreme-ultraviolet wavelength of light. The 16-megapixel images were captured by NASA’s High Resolution Coronal Imager, or Hi-C, which was launched on a sounding rocket on July 11th. The Hi-C telescope…

The Sun has changed its character

Guest post by David Archibald A number of solar parameters are weak, and none is weaker than the Ap Index: Figure 1: Ap Index 1932 to 2026 Figure 1 shows the Ap Index from 1932 with a projection to the end of Solar Cycle 24 in 2026. The Ap Index has not risen much above…

Annular Solar Eclipse 2012 – data and images

I’ve been asked to provide some information on the upcoming eclipse Sunday, so here it is. I’ll actually miss the first part of the Heartland conference (Sunday night and Monday) due to the promise to my children we’d see this together. Timing for the eclipse, getting back from the spot I’ve picked out in the…

Sunspot AR1476 takes aim on Earth

From Spaceweather.com NOAA forecasters estimate a 75% chance of M-class solar flares and a 20% chance of X-flares during the next 24 hours. Any eruptions are likely to be geoeffective because the source, sunspot AR1476, is directly facing our planet. Yesterday, May 10th, amateur astronomer David Maidment of Sohar, Oman caught the active region in…

Solar cycle update for April – sun still slumping

Got a bit sidetracked earlier in the month, this is overdue for an update. Earlier we reported that Hathaway had updated his solar cycle prediction saying “…the predicted size makes this the smallest sunspot cycle in about 100 years. “. April solar index numbers seem to support this prediction. All three main solar indexes tracked…

A Tale of Two Altitudes: how stratospheric temperature is de-coupled from the surface temperatures

On the battle between Arrhenius and Ångström. Story submitted by John Kehr, The Inconvenient Skeptic Any serious discussion about the Theory of Global Warming will eventually include the absorption band argument that started more than 100 years ago between Arrhenius and Ångström.  One of the arguments presented by Ångström was that the main CO2 absorption…

Geomagnetic data reveal unusual nature of recent solar minimum

From the American Geophysical Union weekly highlights: Key Points Minimum 23-24 showed recurrence intervals of 9.0 and 6.7-d Historical geomagnetic activity data show that minimum 23-24 was unusual The heliosphere during minimum 23-24 had unusual sectorial structure Since the mid-1800s, scientists have been systematically measuring changes in the Earth’s magnetic field and the occurrence of…

Homeland Security takes on The Carrington Event

While we worry about future threats like global warming, and present threats like Iran’s escalating nuclear program, the sun’s propensity for belching out monstrous solar flares (like the Carrington event of 1859) could almost instantly create a world without modern conveniences, or even electricity.  The sun could literally “bomb us back to the stone age”.…

Do Latest Solar Studies Confirm Upcoming Global Cooling?

Guest post by Matti Vooro I fully support the findings of  Jan –Erik Solheim , Kjell Stordahl and Ole Humlum and their very recent paper called The long sunspot cycle 23 predicts a significant temperature decrease in cycle 24  dated February 2012. The abstract reads: Relations between the length of a sunspot cycle and the…