NASA flights gauge summer sea ice melt in the Arctic

  From NASA By Maria-Jose Viñas, NASA’s Earth Science News Team Earlier this year, Arctic sea ice sank to a record low wintertime extent for the third straight year. Now NASA is flying a set of instruments north of Greenland to observe the impact of the melt season on the Arctic’s oldest and thickest sea…

Enormous Aquifer Discovered Under Greenland Ice Sheet

From NASA, I had to laugh at this statement: The water in the aquifer has the potential to raise global sea level by 0.016 inches (0.4 mm). That’s assuming it can get out sometime in the distant future. Greenland’s topography under the ice is bowl shaped. =================================== Buried underneath compacted snow and ice in Greenland…

Negative feedback? Storing CO2 in the Arctic

From the Massachusetts Institute of Technology: While the Arctic Ocean is largely a carbon sink, researchers find parts are also a source of atmospheric carbon dioxide For the past three decades, as the climate has warmed, the massive plates of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean have shrunk: In 2007, scientists observed nearly 50 percent…

Lakes discovered beneath Greenland ice sheet

From the University of Cambridge The subglacial lakes are the first to be identified in Greenland The study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, discovered two subglacial lakes 800 metres below the Greenland Ice Sheet. The two lakes are each roughly 8-10 km2, and at one point may have been up to three times larger than…

NASA to do summer aerial melt watch for Greenland

NASA Begins Airborne Campaign to Map Greenland Ice Sheet Summer Melt For the first time, a NASA airborne campaign will measure changes in the height of the Greenland Ice Sheet and surrounding Arctic sea ice produced by a single season of summer melt. NASA’s C-130 research aircraft flew from the Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops…

The WUWT Hot Sheet for September 12th, 2013

Climate models wildly overestimated global warming, study finds Can you rely on the weather forecast? Maybe not, at least when it comes to global warming predictions over short time periods. That’s the upshot of a new study in the journal Nature Climate Change that compared 117 climate predictions made in the 1990’s to the actual amount of…

Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup

The Week That Was: 2013-08-31 (August 31, 2013) Brought to You by SEPP (www.SEPP.org) The Science and Environmental Policy Project ################################################### Quote of the Week: Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.—Voltaire [H/t J.A. Curry & P.J. Webster] ################################################### Number of the Week: 22 ################################################### THIS WEEK: By Ken Haapala, Executive Vice…

New study: Antarctic and Greenland ice sheet melt may be natural event, no consensus on cause

Ice sheets are the largest potential source of future sea level rise – and they also possess the largest uncertainty over their future behaviour From the University of Bristol Continuous satellite monitoring of ice sheets needed to better predict sea-level rise The findings, published in Nature Geoscience, underscore the need for continuous satellite monitoring of…

Great News from Greenland

Guest essay by Dr. Patrick J. Michaels I recently returned from a trip to Greenland’s Jokabshavn Glacier, which discharges more ice than any other in the Northern Hemisphere. Our route of flight from Reykjavik traversed the ice cap from about fifty miles north of Angmassalik to the airport at Ilulissat, on Disko Bay, about one-third…

How “Science” Counts Bears

Guest essay by Jim Steele, director emeritus, San Francisco State University The Inuit claim “it is the time of the most polar bears.” By synthesizing their community’s observations they have demonstrated a greater accuracy counting Bowhead whales and polar bears than the models of credentialed scientists. To estimate correctly, it takes a village. In contrast…

Remember that ‘unprecedented’ Greenland ice sheet surface melt that was allegedly caused by global warming? Never mind

We covered this extensively at WUWT last summer, including the “unprecedented claim” where a researcher said it was a recurring 150 year event that was ‘right on time‘. It turns out jet stream changes and thin cloud cover was the driver. Also “the analysis shows that ocean temperatures and Arctic sea-ice cover were relatively unimportant…

Multiple, Intense, Abrupt Late Pleistocene Warming And Cooling: Implications For Understanding The Cause Of Global Climate Change

Guest essay by Dr. Don J. Easterbrook Dept. of Geology, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA The results of oxygen isotope measurements from ice cores in the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets several decades ago stunned the scientific world. Among the surprises from the cores was the recognition of multiple, late Pleistocene, extraordinarily abrupt, intense periods…

Good news: World’s biggest ice sheets likely more stable than previously believed – upsets previous estimates of melting and sea level

Researchers show that high ancient shorelines do not necessarily reflect ice sheet collapse millions of years ago From the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research: For decades, scientists have used ancient shorelines to predict the stability of today’s largest ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. Markings of a high shoreline from three million years ago, for…

Uncertainty be damned, let’s make ice and sea level projections anyway

‘A better path’ toward projecting, planning for rising seas on a warmer Earth From Princeton University, by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications More useful projections of sea level are possible despite substantial uncertainty about the future behavior of massive ice sheets, according to Princeton University researchers. In two recent papers in the journals Nature Climate…

Modeling sea level rise is an ‘uneven’ proposition

From the British Antarctic Survey New projections of ‘uneven’ global sea-level rise Reporting in the journal Geophysical Research Letters researchers have looked ahead to the year 2100 to show how ice loss will continue to add to rising sea levels Sophisticated computer modelling has shown how sea-level rise over the coming century could affect some…

First complete ice core record of last interglacial period shows the climate of Greenland to be significantly warmer than today

Study: ‘ Greenland ice sheet is not as sensitive to temperature increases and to ice melting and running out to sea in warm climate periods ‘. From the University of Copenhagen Greenland ice cores reveal warm climate of the past In the period between 130,000 and 115,000 years ago, Earth’s climate was warmer than today.…

Glacially modeled snow job

From the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)  Alarmism, I think maybe they are a bit unclear on the concept of how glaciers work. As snowfall varies with the seasons, the flow of ice speeds up and slows down. Besides, it isn’t real data, but just another modeling scenario tweaked for a particular outcome.…

Why ice loss and sea level measurements via satellite and the new Shepherd et al paper are highly uncertain at the moment

There’s a paper (Shepherd et al) on ice loss and sea level rise that has been making the rounds in media (such as this article in Science Recorder, claiming it validates global warming) that is causing some stir, mainly because it has a powerfully written press release combined with a volume of researchers (47 scientists),…

More on noisy Greenland ice loss data from GRACE

Embracing data ‘noise’ brings Greenland’s complex ice melt into focus by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications, Princeton Universtity An enhanced approach to capturing changes on the Earth’s surface via satellite could provide a more accurate account of how ice sheets, river basins and other geographic areas are changing as a result of natural and human…

More hype on Greenland’s summer melt

You may recall the bogus claim of “97% of Greenland Ice melted”, that was dialed back (REP’s last story on WUWT). Now there’s more of the same sort of stuff. See this PR, and note my bold for the money quote. From the City College of New York Greenland melting breaks record 4 weeks before…

‘We don’t believe the ice cores can be interpreted purely as a signal of temperature’

From the University of Wisconsin: Greenland ice may exaggerate magnitude of 13,000-year-old deep freeze by Chris Barncard Ice samples pulled from nearly a mile below the surface of Greenland glaciers have long served as a historical thermometer, adding temperature data to studies of the local conditions up to the Northern Hemisphere’s climate. But the method…

Historical Imagery of Greenland Glaciers Lessens Sea Level Rise Alarm

By Pat Michaels via World Climate Report A new study using historical images of glaciers in southeast Greenland to investigate glacier response to climate changes suggests that the recently observed acceleration of ice loss from Greenland may not be a long-term phenomenon. Instead, as marine terminating glaciers reach their grounding line and as the termini…

CryoSat repurposed from sea ice to bathymetry

From the European Space Agency: CryoSat goes to sea CryoSat was launched in 2010 to measure sea-ice thickness in the Arctic, but data from the Earth-observing satellite have also been exploited for other studies. High-resolution mapping of the topography of the ocean floor is now being added to the ice mission’s repertoire. The main objective…

Glaciers can speed up, but can’t put out

From the National Science Foundation: Press Release 12-088 Analysis of Speed of Greenland Glaciers Gives New Insight for Rising Sea Level Researchers determine that although glaciers continue to increase in velocity, the rate at which they can dump ice into the ocean is limited Jakobshavn Isfjord (ice fjord)–the largest outlet glacier on Greenland’s West Coast.…

Cache of historical Arctic sea ice maps discovered

Arctic Sea ice data collected by DMI 1893-1961 Guest post by Frank Lansner I came across a number of maps showing Arctic ice extend from 1893 to 1961 collected by DMI in “Nautisk Meteorologisk Aarbog”. Each year DMI have collected information on sea ice extend so that normally each of the months April, May, June,…

Supraglacialslipsialidosis

From the University of Colorado at Boulder, worry over something that is a natural process that has happened for thousands of years. You gotta love this one: ” Catastrophic lake drainages were 3.5 times more likely to occur during the warmest years than the coldest years.”. Gee, ya think? Or how about this one: “Once…