Enormous Aquifer Discovered Under Greenland Ice Sheet

From NASA, I had to laugh at this statement: The water in the aquifer has the potential to raise global sea level by 0.016 inches (0.4 mm). That’s assuming it can get out sometime in the distant future. Greenland’s topography under the ice is bowl shaped. =================================== Buried underneath compacted snow and ice in Greenland…

Lakes discovered beneath Greenland ice sheet

From the University of Cambridge The subglacial lakes are the first to be identified in Greenland The study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, discovered two subglacial lakes 800 metres below the Greenland Ice Sheet. The two lakes are each roughly 8-10 km2, and at one point may have been up to three times larger than…

Gatekeeping at Geophysical Research Letters

Dr. Judith Curry writes: As the IPCC struggles with its inconvenient truth – the pause and the growing discrepancy between models and observations – the obvious question is: why is the IPCC just starting to grapple with this issue now, essentially two minutes before midnite of the release of the AR5? … My blog post…

Transient Van Allen radiation belt discovered

From the University of California – Los Angeles How did a third radiation belt appear in the Earth’s upper atmosphere? Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts in in the Earth’s upper atmosphere in 1958, space scientists have believed that these belts consisted of two doughnut-shaped rings of highly charged particles — an…

AGU says CO2 is plant food

Elevated carbon dioxide making arid regions greener 31 May 2013 AGU Release No. 13-24 WASHINGTON, DC—Scientists have long suspected that a flourishing of green foliage around the globe, observed since the early 1980s in satellite data, springs at least in part from the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere. Now, a study of…

Climate models getting worse than we thought

New paper finds climate models are getting worse rather than better Via the Hockey Schtick: A paper published today in Geophysical Research Letters finds that the latest climate models are performing even worse than the earlier generations of climate models in predicting “…both the mean surface air temperature as well as the frequency of extreme…

Climate Craziness of the week – with the physical signature of UHI staring them right in the face, Mann & Borenstein go with their ‘gut’ instincts

Some people wonder if Michael Mann is simply an activist masquerading as a scientist, this lends credence to that idea. I wonder if Dr. Mann has ever visited weather stations in China to understand what is going on there? I have. I had to laugh when I saw this quote from Mann in Seth Borenstein’s…

Dr. Michael Mann, Smooth Operator

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach People sometimes ask why I don’t publish in the so-called scientific journals. Here’s a little story about that. Back in 2004, Michael Mann wrote a mathematically naive piece about how to smooth the ends of time series. It was called “On smoothing potentially non-stationary climate time series“, and it was…

Modeling sea level rise is an ‘uneven’ proposition

From the British Antarctic Survey New projections of ‘uneven’ global sea-level rise Reporting in the journal Geophysical Research Letters researchers have looked ahead to the year 2100 to show how ice loss will continue to add to rising sea levels Sophisticated computer modelling has shown how sea-level rise over the coming century could affect some…

Mercury in California fog linked to ocean upwelling

From the AGU fall meeting in SFO and the University of California – Santa Cruz  comes this rather odd statement that I thought was interesting. It seems like an ecological horror story until you realize it is all natural processes involved. Mercury in coastal fog linked to upwelling of deep ocean water SANTA CRUZ, CA–An…

Glaciergate post script – they’ll shrink anyway

From Brigham Young University and the “IPCC, take your 2035 and shove it” department comes this study: Himalayan glaciers will shrink even if temperatures hold steady Come rain or shine, or even snow, some glaciers of the Himalayas will continue shrinking for many years to come. The forecast by Brigham Young University geology professor Summer…

Sea Level Acceleration: Not so Fast Recently

By Dr. Patrick Michaels from World Climate Report Sea level rise is a topic that we frequently focus on because of all the gross environmental alterations which may result from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, it is perhaps the only one which could lead to conditions unexperienced by modern societies. A swift (or accelerating) sea level…

RC’s Dr. Eric Steig boreholes himself on Antarctica

This is something that needs wider circulation, hence its appearance here. I’ve been mulling over how to best present this, and decided there’s nothing I could do in the way of excerpts that still told the story effectively, so I decided to present it in full. I’m pretty sure Jeff won’t mind. Readers may recall…

Has Trenberth’s missing heat been found? Southern Oceans are losing heat

A paper published August 20th in Geophysical Research Letters finds from newly deployed observation systems that the Southern Oceans show an annual net heat loss of -10 Wm-2. Key Points Southern Ocean air-sea fluxes are under-observed, leading to large uncertainty The first year-long air-sea flux observations quantify an annual cycle Shows seasonal cycle, small annual…

Earth’s entire thermal infrared spectrum observed

From AGU highlights, interesting, but readers should note that this is one point on Earth in Chile, not a summation of the  atmospheric absorption, emission, and transmission of infrared radiation for the entire globe. For first time, entire thermal infrared spectrum observed The driving mechanism of the greenhouse effect, and the underpinning of modern anthropogenic…

Study shows the Arctic was much colder while Earth was warmer during Eemian warm period

Warm Climate – Cold Arctic? The Eemian is a poor analogue for current climate change 12.06.2012/Kiel. The Eemian interglacial period that began some 125,000 years ago is often used as a model for contemporary climate change. In the international journal “Geophysical Research Letters” scientists from Mainz, Kiel and Potsdam (Germany) now present evidence that the…

Trenberth’s missing heat still missing: new paper shows a near flat ocean temperature trend – 0.09°C over the past 55 years

A new paper published today in Geophysical Research Letters describes how the oceans have warmed only 0.09°C over the last 55 years, from 1955-2010. Don’t let the red line fool you, read on. Key Points A strong positive linear trend in exists in world ocean heat content since 1955 One third of the observed warming…

Models say a future shift of western USA to “drier stormier”

More of the “extreme events” meme… From the AGU weekly highlights Regional models expect drier, stormier western United States Key Points Statistically significant increases in western US future extreme winter precipitation Eight dynamically downscaled GCM simulations show generalized agreement Spatial pattern of changes in mean precip. is different than that of extremes As American southwestern…

Climate Science From the Onion?

Guest post by Dr. Patrick Michaels Three items appeared last week that make me wonder if The Onion is surreptitiously acquiring science journals and trade publications. Here’s what one, “ScienceNordic” says it does on its home page: Our team of experienced science reporters and editors follow the regional scientific communities closely, and report constantly and…

Geomagnetic data reveal unusual nature of recent solar minimum

From the American Geophysical Union weekly highlights: Key Points Minimum 23-24 showed recurrence intervals of 9.0 and 6.7-d Historical geomagnetic activity data show that minimum 23-24 was unusual The heliosphere during minimum 23-24 had unusual sectorial structure Since the mid-1800s, scientists have been systematically measuring changes in the Earth’s magnetic field and the occurrence of…

Climate modeling turkey shoot, western style

Western U.S. Precipitation Extremes—How Did This Turkey Get Published? By Dr. Patrick Michaels When it comes to changes in future precipitation across the United States, climate models projections are all over the map. In other words, they provide no useful guidance for the future. But that doesn’t stop people from trying to sell them. Now…

Mann and coining the AMO and claims of credit

Junkscience.com writes: Did Michael Mann falsely claim to coin a famous climate term actually coined by someone else? In Mann’s new book “The Hockey Stick and Climate Wars”, Mann writes: The multidecadal oscillation I’d helped discover would nonethless become a cause celebre among climate change contrarians. It would even get a name: the “Atlantic Multidecadal…

Greenland’s pronounced glacier retreat not irreversible

Via the AGU weekly highlights: In recent decades, the combined forces of climate warming and short-term variability have forced the massive glaciers that blanket Greenland into retreat, with some scientists worrying that deglaciation could become irreversible. The short history of detailed glacier observations, however, makes pinning the ice loss to either short-term dynamics or long-term…

Death Valley’s Big Bang Theory

From the The Earth Institute at Columbia University Waiting for Death Valley’s Big Bang A volcanic explosion crater may have future potential In California’s Death Valley, death is looking just a bit closer. Geologists have determined that the half-mile-wide Ubehebe Crater, formed by a prehistoric volcanic explosion, was created far more recently than previously thought—and…

Study: Getting the S out of jet fuel may cool the climate

This study from Yale University  seems contradictory to what we know about aerosols. Generally more aerosols like SO2 cool the climate, but in this case they are saying “it’s offset by the cooling effect of nitrate that forms from nitrogen oxides in jet exhaust.” Interesting. Removing sulfur from jet fuel cools climate A Yale study…

Possible earthquake early warning signal discovered

From the AGU: An atmospheric precursor to the recent Japan megaquake Most scientists believe that earthquakes are inherently unpredictable, and reports of various kinds of earthquake precursor signals have been difficult to verify. However, in a new study, Heki reports a possible ionospheric precursor to the devastating 11 March 2011 magnitude 9 Tohoku earthquake in…

Getting GRLed

Dr. Roger Pielke Jr. recently submitted this paper to Geophysical Research Letters (GRL): A homogeneous database of global landfalling tropical cyclones Jessica Weinkle* and Roger Pielke, Jr. Center for Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Colorado, 1333 Grandview Ave, Campus Box 488, Boulder, Colorado 80309 Abstract In recent decades, economic damage from tropical cyclones…

Bill Illis: Clouds account for most of the variability in net radiation at the Top of the Atmosphere

While we are marveling at the recent revelation out of Serbia that shows a connection between cosmic rays, clouds and temperature, our own volunteer moderator, Roger (Tallbloke) noticed and collated some comments from Bill Illis which are well worth repeating here. Thanks Rog for catching this while I was otherwise engaged. I repeat his post…

What do sea measurements reveal about Earth’s temperature trend?

From the AGU highlights Despite the fact that average temperatures on land have been increasing from year to year, globally averaged surface temperatures from 2000 to 2010 have shown only moderate warming. This is because sea surface temperatures over the past decade have been flat, if not slightly decreasing. In light of this, scientists are…