Northern Polar Vortex Page

Go here and here for background information on Polar Vortices.

Wind

Northern Polar Wind – It is recommended that click down through each height in succession so you that can see polar vorticity with depth:
10 hPa/mb – Approximately 31,000 meters (101,700 feet) Wide and Focused Perspective
70 hPa/mb – Approximately 18,000 meters (59,000 feet) Wide and Focused Perspective
250 hPa/mb – Approximately 10,400 meters (34,000 feet) Wide and Focused Perspective

Geopotential Height
Northern Hemisphere – Vertical Cross Section of Geopotential Height Anomalies (Polar Vortex)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

1 hPa/mb Height Analysis – Approximately 50,000 meters (164,000 feet):

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

2 hPa/mb Height Analysis – Approximately 42,500 meters (140,000 feet):

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

5 hPa/mb Height Analysis – Approximately 35,000 meters (115,000 feet):

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

10 hPa/mb Height Analysis – Approximately 31,000 meters (101,700 feet):

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

30 hPa/mb Height Analysis – Approximately 23,700 meters (77,800 feet):

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

50 hPa/mb Height Analysis – Approximately 20,100 meters (66,000 feet):

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

70 hPa/mb Height Analysis – Approximately 18,000 meters (59,000 feet):

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

100 hPa/mb Height Analysis – Approximately 15,000 meters (49,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Global – 200-hPa/mb Height Anomalies – Atmospheric Pressure Anomalies at Approximately 12,000 meters (40,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Click the pic to view at source

Northern Hemisphere 250-hPa/mb Heights and Wind Speeds – Atmospheric Pressure Anomalies at Approximately 10,400 meters (34,000 feet)

National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

View an animated version of the graphic above – Click Here

Northern Hemisphere – 500-hPa /mb Height Anomalies – Atmospheric Pressure Anomalies At Approximately 5500 meters (18,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Northern Hemisphere – 500-hPa/mb Geopotential Height and Vorticity – Approximately 5500 meters (18,000 feet)

Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies (COLA) – Institute of Global Environment and Society (IGES) – Click the pic to view at source

Temperature

1 hPa/mb Temperature Analysis – Approximately 50,000 meters (164,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

2 hPa/mb Temperature Analysis – Approximately 42,500 meters (140,000 feet):

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

5 hPa/mb Temperature Analysis – Approximately 35,000 meters (115,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

10 hPa/mb Temperature Analysis – Approximately 31,000 meters (101,700 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

30 hPa/mb Temperature Analysis – Approximately 23,700 meters (77,800 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

50 hPa/mb Temperature Analysis – Approximately 20,100 meters (66,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

70 hPa/mb Temperature Analysis – Approximately 18,000 meters (59,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

100 hPa/mb Temperature Analysis – Approximately 15,000 (49,213 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Northern Hemisphere Area Where Temperature is Below 195K or -78C (Temperature below which Polar Stratospheric Clouds May Form)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Zonal Temperature Anomaly Time Series

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

50-hPa/mb Zonal Mean Temperature Anomalies – Approximately 20,100 meters (66,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Global – 10-hPa/mb Height Temperature Anomalies – Atmospheric Temperature Anomalies At Approximately 31,000 meters (101,700 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Global – 30-hPa/mb Height Temperature Anomalies – Atmospheric Temperature Anomalies At Approximately 23,700 meters (77,800 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Global – 50-hPa/mb Height Temperature Anomalies – Atmospheric Temperature Anomalies At Approximately 20,100 meters (66,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Northern Polar Temperature Lower Stratosphere (TLS) – 1979 to Present

Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) – Microwave Sounding Units (MSU) – Click the pic to view at source

Ozone
“Ozone Hole” “The word hole isn’t literal; no place is empty of ozone. Scientists use the word hole as a metaphor for the area in which ozone concentrations drop below the historical threshold of 220 Dobson Units.”

Ozone Mixing Ratio map showing a slight “Ozone Hole” within the Vortex:

1 hPa/mb Ozone Mixing Ratio – Approximately 50,000 meters (164,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

2 hPa/mb Ozone Mixing Ratio – Approximately 42,500 meters (140,000 feet):

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

5 hPa/mb Ozone Mixing Ratio – Approximately 35,000 meters (115,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

10 hPa/mb Ozone Mixing Ratio – Approximately 31,000 meters (101,700 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

30 hPa/mb Ozone Mixing Ratio – Approximately 23,700 meters (77,800 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

50-hPa/mb Ozone Mixing Ratio – Approximately 20,100 meters (66,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

70-hPa/mb Ozone Mixing Ratio – Approximately 18,000 meters (59,000 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

100-hPa/mb Ozone Mixing Ratio – Approximately 15,000 (49,213 feet)

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Northern Hemisphere Total Stratospheric Ozone

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Planetary Waves

Zonal Wave #1 Amplitude Time Series:

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Zonal Wave #2 Amplitude Jan, Feb, March Time Series:

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Coriolis Torque

Vertical and Zonal Integral Of Coriolis Torque

National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

Mountain Torque

Vertical and Zonal Integral Of Mountain Torque

National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source


Eddy Heat Flux

Strong negative fluxes indicate poleward flux of heat via eddies. Multiple strong poleward episodes will result in a smaller polar vortex, Sudden Stratospheric Warmings and an earlier transition from winter to summer circulations. Relatively small flux amplitudes will result in a more stable polar vortex and will extend the winter circulation well into the Spring

10 day Averaged Eddy Heat Flux Towards The North Pole At 100mb

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Atmospheric Transmission of Solar Radiation

UV Erythemal Daily Dosage

NOAA – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

Source Guide

Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies (COLA) – Institute of Global Environment and Society (IGES)
Home Page – http://wxmaps.org/pix.html
Height and Vorticity Analyses Page – http://wxmaps.org/pix/analyses.html?bandwidth=high
Hurricane Potential Page – http://wxmaps.org/pix/hurpot.html?bandwidth=high
Forecast Page – http://wxmaps.org/pix/forecasts.html?bandwidth=high

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL)
Home Page – http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/
Physical Sciences Division (PSD) Products Page – http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/products/
Physical Sciences Division (PSD) Data Data Page – http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/
Physical Sciences Division (PSD) Data Maps Page – http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/map/

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC)
Home Page – http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/about/about.html?bandwidth=high
Products Page – http://www.ncdc.noaa.govgov/oa/ncdc.html?bandwidth=high
Stratosphere Page – http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/stratosphere/?bandwidth=high
FTP Page – http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/cmb/?bandwidth=high

National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Weather Service – Climate Prediction Center
Home Page – http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/
Products Page – http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/
Monitoring and Data Products Page – http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/MD_index.shtml
Atmospheric & SST Indices Page – http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/data/indices/
Regional Climate Maps – http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/regional_monitoring/
Monitoring and Data Page – http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/monitoring_and_data/
FTP Page – ftp://ftp.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/

Policlimate.com | Ryan Maue’s Weather Maps (NCEP GFS, NAM, WRF and ECMWF)
http://policlimate.com/weather/

Remote Sensing Systems (RSS)
Home Page – http://ssmi.com/?bandwidth=high
MSU Page – http://ssmi.com/msu/msu_browse.html?bandwidth=high
MSU FTP Page – ftp://ftp.ssmi.com/msu/?bandwidth=high
FTP Page – ftp://ftp.ssmi.com/?bandwidth=high

StormSurf.com
Home Page – http://www.stormsurf.com/
Model Products Page – http://www.stormsurf.com/mdls/menu.html
Weather Model – Global Jet Stream Wind and 250 mb Pressure – http://www.stormsurfing.com/cgi/display_alt.cgi?a=glob_250
Wave Mode – North Atlantic Surface Pressure and Wind – http://www.stormsurfing.com/cgi/display.cgi?a=natla_slp

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