‘Spider lightning’ seen from space

From NOAA/NESDIS: When you spend 24/7/365 staring at Earth, you see some strange things. The NOAA GOES East satellite (GOES-16) witnessed a frightening display of stratiform, or ‘spider’ lightning as it’s known, in October 2017 over the central plains in the U.S. The GOES-R series of satellites (which includes GOES-16 and the recently launched GOES-17)…

New capabilities on NOAA satellite help predict lightning strikes

From NASA/GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER Flashy first images arrive from NOAA’s GOES-16 lightning mapper Detecting and predicting lightning just got a lot easier. The first images from a new instrument onboard NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite are giving NOAA National Weather Service forecasters richer information about lightning that will help them alert the public to dangerous weather.…

How lightning strikes can improve storm forecasts

From the UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Humans have always been frightened and fascinated by lightning. This month, NASA is scheduled to launch a new satellite that will provide the first nonstop, high-tech eye on lightning over the North American section of the planet. University of Washington researchers have been tracking global lightning from the ground for more…

The study of ‘fossilized’ lightning

From the UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA (USF INNOVATION) Study provides a new method to measure the energy of a lightning strike By investigating ‘fossilized’ sand cylinders made by lightning strikes, sometimes thousands of years old, a University of South Florida professor provides a unique history of lightning and the energy contained in a single strike…

High-speed camera captures amazing lightning flash

Super-slow-motion footage from recent Florida storm From the FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MELBOURNE, FLA. — Scientists at Florida Institute of Technology used a high-speed camera to capture an amazing lighting flash from a May 20 storm near the university’s Melbourne campus. The flash was recorded at 7,000 frames per second (FPS). The playback speed seen…

Curious claim – lightning erodes mountains

From the University of the Witwatersrand New evidence on lightning strikes By Kanina Foss Lightning strikes causing rocks to explode have for the first time been shown to play a huge role in shaping mountain landscapes in southern Africa, debunking previous assumptions that angular rock formations were necessarily caused by cold temperatures, and proving that…

Making ball lightning

From the American Chemical Society New insights into the 1-in-a-million lightning called ‘ball lightning’ One of the rare scientific reports on the rarest form of lightning — ball lightning — describes better ways of producing this mysterious phenomenon under the modern laboratory conditions needed to explain it. The new study on a phenomenon that puzzled…

China’s big jet – not the passenger kind

From the Science China Press Is there gigantic jet event in middle latitude region in mainland China? When talking about lightning, appearances of different lightning which occur along with thunderstorms will emerge in the minds of the people and these lightning occur in the troposphere. However, in addition to lightning in the troposphere, there are…

An explanation for ball lightning?

I wonder how long it will be before Al Gore tries to blame ball lightning on “dirty weather”? A neat video follows. From CSIRO: Goodness, gracious, great balls of lightning Sightings of balls of lightning have been made for centuries around the world – usually the size of a grapefruit and lasting up to twenty seconds…

Wildest lightning strike I’ve ever seen

Why being in a car during a lightning storm is the safest place to be As watcher of weather, both as as a one-time storm chaser as well as a person who gets sent email about weather of all kinds, I’ll have to say I’ve never seen anything like this video.  The National Weather Service…

NASA seeing sprites

From the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center High above the clouds during thunderstorms, some 50 miles above Earth a different kind of lightning dances. Bursts of red and blue light, known as “sprites,” flash for a scant one thousandth of a second. They are often only visible to those in flight above a storm, and happen…

Lightning induced Schumann Resonance may help divine exoplanets

From the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Science nugget: Lightning signature could help reveal the solar system’s origins Every second, lightning flashes some 50 times on Earth. Together these discharges coalesce and get stronger, creating electromagnetic waves circling around Earth, to create a beating pulse between the ground and the lower ionosphere, about 60 miles up…

Crowdsourced Climate Complexity – Compiling the WUWT Potential Climatic Variables Reference Page

By WUWT regular “Just The Facts” With the help of an array of WUWT reader comments, which began on this thread on January, 15th 2011, and grew on January 22nd, 2011, February 10th, 2011, February 28th, 2011, June 30th, 2011 and January 21st, 2012, I have been compiling a summary of all potential climatic variables…

Storm elves and sprites recorded on video

From Eurka Alert: FECYT – Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology A team of Spanish researchers has made a high-speed recording of elves and sprites in storms, fleeting and luminous electric phenomena produced in the upper layers of the atmosphere. Their analysis of these observations has been published in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

Another UHI effect – thunderstorms & lightning

The March-April edition of WeatherWise magazine has an interesting article in it regarding UHI (Urban Heat Island) effects of enhancing thunderstorm formation in the downwind heat plume. It Stems from this paper (PDF) published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. I saw a similar study presented in August 2007 when I attended Dr.…