‘Spider lightning’ seen from space

From NOAA/NESDIS: When you spend 24/7/365 staring at Earth, you see some strange things. The NOAA GOES East satellite (GOES-16) witnessed a frightening display of stratiform, or ‘spider’ lightning as it’s known, in October 2017 over the central plains in the U.S. The GOES-R series of satellites (which includes GOES-16 and the recently launched GOES-17)…

New capabilities on NOAA satellite help predict lightning strikes

From NASA/GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER Flashy first images arrive from NOAA’s GOES-16 lightning mapper Detecting and predicting lightning just got a lot easier. The first images from a new instrument onboard NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite are giving NOAA National Weather Service forecasters richer information about lightning that will help them alert the public to dangerous weather.…

How lightning strikes can improve storm forecasts

From the UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Humans have always been frightened and fascinated by lightning. This month, NASA is scheduled to launch a new satellite that will provide the first nonstop, high-tech eye on lightning over the North American section of the planet. University of Washington researchers have been tracking global lightning from the ground for more…

The study of ‘fossilized’ lightning

From the UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA (USF INNOVATION) Study provides a new method to measure the energy of a lightning strike By investigating ‘fossilized’ sand cylinders made by lightning strikes, sometimes thousands of years old, a University of South Florida professor provides a unique history of lightning and the energy contained in a single strike…