MLO and the MEI

In my last post, which was about the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) in Hawaii, Dr. Richard Keen and others noted that for a good comparison, there was a need to remove the variations due to El Nino. Dr. Keen said that he uses the Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) for such removal. And what is the…

When Eruptions Don’t

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach Inspired by Richard Keen’s interesting WUWT post on using eclipses to determine the clarity of the atmosphere, I went to the website of the Hawaiian Mauna Loa Observatory. They have some very fascinating datasets. One of them is a measurement of direct solar radiation, minute by minute, since about 1980. I…

Hockeystick Redux Chapter Fortyleven

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach [See update at the end] Since publishing my last two posts here and here on the Church and White (“C&W”) 2011 sea level dataset, some folks have queried why I didn’t use the Church and White 2013 dataset instead. The answer is simple. It’s because of the hockeystick. What hockeystick, you…

The Climate of Gavin

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach Gavin Schmidt, who I am given to understand is a good computer programmer, is one of the principals at the incongruously named website “RealClimate”. The name is incongruous because they censor anyone who dares to disagree with their revealed wisdom. I bring this up because I’m on Twitter, @WEschenbach. You’re…

Changes in the Rate of Sea Level Rise

  Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach There’s been some discussion of the rate of sea level rise lately, so I thought I’d take a look at some underlying data. I started with a 2016 paper by the modern master of failed serial doomcasting, James Hansen. It has the frightening title of “Ice melt, sea level…

Clouds and El Nino

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach After the turn of the century, I became interested in climate science. But unlike almost everyone else, I wasn’t surprised by how much the global temperature was changing. As someone with experience with heat engines and engine governors, I know how hard it is to keep a heat engine stable…

Symmetry and Balance

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach The CERES satellite dataset is a never-ending source of amazement and interest. I got to thinking about how much energy is actually stoking the immense climate engine. Of course, virtually all the energy comes from the sun. (There is a bit of geothermal, but it’s much less than a watt…