The best way to win an argument

Mike Jonas writes: The BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation, UK) looks at analysis that could lead to more moderate attitudes. This BBC article provides some food for thought that is relevant to the climate debate. It looks at a paper “Political Extremism Is Supported by an Illusion of Understanding” by Fernbach, Rogers, Fox and Sloman, which…

Climate alarmists make major blunder in reporting Antarctica ice loss results

Guest essay by Larry Hamlin Total ice loss from latest study is “consistent” with, not “double” prior study measurements Numerous recent climate alarmist articles addressing the recent study results reported for the new CryoSat-2 radar altimeter satellite methodology with increased land area orbital coverage capability for evaluating ice loss in Antarctica between 2010 and 2013…

Weather station ‘X’

A mystery for you. This weekend (weather permitting) Willis and I will be visiting the location of this weather station in the USA. Can you guess where it is? I can assure you it is not the schoolhouse at Bodega nor is it Alfred Hitchcock’s summer house.

Analysis: What the World Needs Now is a Lot Less Poverty

What is “the biggest single barrier to improving societal resilience to the vagaries of climate.”? In a News & Analysis item recently published in Science, Kintisch (2014) discusses the most recent IPCC report, noting it “is meant to be a practical guide to action,” especially in regard to what the report identifies as eight major…

An oldie but goodie from Josh – still valid today

Given what has transpired in the last couple of weeks with ‘John Cook’s 97% consensus’  and the revelations about his data, and the University of Queensland invoking the Streisand effect with their ridiculous threat letter, it seems this cartoon still applies, perhaps now more so than ever.

Global warming might make less biting, itching, scratching

From the University of Montreal , something that might actually be a good thing if true. If warmer temperatures make mostly male insects, then this might also apply to mosquitoes, and only the females bite. OK, it’s a bit of a stretch, but no more so than the press release. Temperature influences gender of offspring…

Tough questions about FOIA abuse to the University of Delaware

Readers may recall this story:The Climate Wars and the University of Delaware. Now, there’s some tough questions that need answers. From: The Viscount Monckton of Brenchley 27 Queen Street | Edinburgh | EH2 1JX The Hon. Beau Biden, Attorney General, State of Delaware attorney.general@state.de.us Sir, Title 29 Ch. 100: Freedom of Information Act §10005 (e) (enforcement)…

Is the climate computable?

Our WUWT thread on Antarctic Sea Ice Losses has spurred quite an interesting discussion. Dr. Robert G. Brown of the Physics Department at Duke University responds to a comment on  ice albedo with a summary of water vapor action, the greenhouse effect, and the chaotic nature of the atmosphere. He ends with his view of…

Climategate as belief system tipping point

From Quadrant Online: Doing science by consensus is not science at all, says the climatologist all the alarmists love to hate. Not that the enmity bothers Judith Curry too much — and certainly not as much as the debasement of impartial inquiry by which the warmist establishment keeps all those lovely grants coming.

The 2014/15 El Niño – Part 9 – Kevin Trenberth is Looking Forward to Another “Big Jump”

In a recent interview, Kevin Trenberth, Distinguished Senior Scientist, from NCAR said the upcoming 2014/15 El Niño might shift global surface temperatures upwards by 0.2 to 0.3 deg C to further the series of upward steps. Curiously, Trenberth is continuing to suggest that the warming we’ve experienced since the mid-1970s resulted from naturally occurring, sunlight-fueled…

Climate Change to Crush Ohio – film at 11

​From the Ohio State University: Climate Change Brings Mostly Bad News for Ohio Early forecasts suggest big algae bloom in Lake Erie, a very dry 2015 By: Pam Frost Gorder COLUMBUS, Ohio— Scientists delivered a mostly negative forecast for how climate change will affect Ohioans during the next year or so, and well beyond.

Hard vs. the Soft Sciences

Guest essay by Steven Burnett This is an essay regarding the fundamental differences between the hard and soft sciences. While I don’t emphasize climatology much in the essay, I believe this may provide some insight into the chasm of evidence and approach between the two. Recently, more climate consenters have been starting to grapple with…

How GISS Temperatures Are Diverging From RSS

By Paul Homewood  A guest post earlier today by David Dohbro, comparing satellite and surface temperature datasets, appears to have attracted a certain amount of criticism, not least because it has tried to compare anomalies based on different baselines. This is an update to that analysis.

Congratulations to Joe “Doc” D’Aleo

I’ve known about this for quite some time, but kept it mum, because as Joe wrote in an email exchange today, “Yes, I was nervous that I would get protesters if it was widely made known.” Below is the photo of Joe getting recognition for his years of service to the meteorological community.

Mann’s new AMO paper: ‘Had I been a reviewer, I would have pointed this out and recommended rejection. ‘

Mann’s new paper recharacterizing the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation A guest post by Nic Lewis Introduction Michael Mann has had a paper on the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) accepted by Geophysical Research Letters: “On forced temperature changes, internal variability, and the AMO”. The paper seeks to overturn the current understanding of the AMO, and provides what…

The Effect of Gleissberg’s “Secular Smoothing”

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach ABSTRACT: Slow Fourier Transform (SFT) periodograms reveal the strength of the cycles in the full sunspot dataset (n=314), in the sunspot cycle maxima data alone (n=28), and the sunspot cycle maxima after they have been “secularly smoothed” using the method of Gleissberg (n = 24). In all three datasets, there…

Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup

The Week That Was: 2014-17-05 (May 17, 2014) Brought to You by SEPP (www.SEPP.org) The Science and Environmental Policy Project  Quote of the Week: “It is dangerous to be right in matters on which the established authorities are wrong” Voltaire [H/t Charles Battig] Number of the Week: 49%. EPA gets a inconvenient letter from a…

“One Guy With A Marker …” DECONSTRUCTED

Guest Posting by Ira Glickstein John Coleman (Co-Founder of The Weather Channel) made a comment on my: earlier WUWT posting  “Ira, please make a video that presents the counter argument so I can put the two videos together for a You Tube “gotcha”. This guy is getting lots of hits and needs to be answered…

A press release I never quite finished reading

Nature Climate Change asks this: How does snow affect the amount of water in rivers? New research has shown for the first time that the amount of water flowing through rivers in snow-affected regions depends significantly on how much of the precipitation falls as snowfall. This means in a warming climate, if less of the…

Ten Good Reasons Not To Worry About Polar Bears

Susan Crockford writes: This year marks the 40th anniversary of the signing of an international agreement to protect polar bears from commercial and unregulated sport hunting. The devastating decades of uncontrolled slaughter across the Arctic, including the Bering Sea, finally came to an end. And so in honour of the International Polar Bear Day (27 February) –…